Resources – Varied

As I talk with genealogists or teach classes people will frequently ask me, “Where did you find that (information)?” or “Where did that come from?”. As a historian,  genealogist and librarian I consistently document my sources. It’s important to give credit to the person who found the info or transcribed the document. It’s also great to look for other clues in the same repository. Similar to a great fishing hole. If the fishing is good, you want to return in the hopes of finding more fish or clues about your ancestors.

I’ve lived most of my life in Indianapolis, In. I have a lot of knowledge about that city. The terrain, streets, buildings, events and etc.  My background knowledge of Indianapolis makes research much simpler.

My Paternal line migrated from Kentucky. I visited several times but did not spend any extended time in that state. Therefore my knowledge was limited. As I began to research my paternal lines, lack of knowledge in that area was a real hindrance to my research.  At the time it wasn’t practical to move their or even visit frequently. My solution was to begin researching on Rootsweb.com .  Rootsweb.com was an independently owned and operated consortium of multiple websites, mailing lists (list servs) and message boards. The topics were broken down by states, counties, areas (ie South-Central Kentucky) and surnames, etc. [Rootsweb is now owned by Ancestry.com .  The people that compile the information has not changed all over the site, but in some areas. I am not being paid to advertise for Ancestry.com or Sandi Gorin . I just want to illustrate who owns and or is creating the information. ]

map with ky outline

Around, 1998 (est.) I joined the SC-KY Listserv (South Central Kentucky) SOUTH-CENTRAL-KENTUCKY@rootsweb.com, .  This gave me an opportunity to learn about the area, boundaries, terrain, schools, names of families,etc.) overtime. This helped me to connect to other researchers with information that has helped me during my research , as well as documents etc.

This morning while reading an entry from Sandi Gorin I read the transcription that is listed below.  This tells a little about the climate of Barren County, KY for enslaved persons.

“We’re back at the city meeting again on Saturday, 9 June 1810. This will be a short meeting with John GORIN, Henry CRUTCHER, Will T BUSH, Danl. CULP & John BIRD present.

The only thing on the agenda was appointing the Tax Collector who was Charles HARVEY. He got a 2nd responsibility though that likely could give him grey hair – he was appointed to take care of the Public Spring. The board then adjourned to meet on the 15th.
And, on the 15 the same trustees gathered for business. Charles HARVEY had to be sworn in and post his bond. David WALKER Jr was his surety. While he was there, the tax rate was decided – 25 cents for every tithable and 8 cents on every $100 worth of property.
A continuing problem had to be discussed. Wm T BUSH & John BIRD had to walk around and take notice of all nuisances and obstructions in the city streets and report to the Board. They might get prematurely grey over this also!
Safety was of a great concern in these early days so the Trustees decided to set up a Watch. Joseph WINLOCK & John MATTHEWS Jr named Captains of the Watch and William GRAY, Joel SHAW, Archibald MILLER, William CRUTCHER & Will MARSH Jr were suggested to assist. They had come in to the meeting it appears and they all volunteered.
Some rules and regulations about the Watch were set next. Anyone caught outdoors after 10 pm and couldn’t show why he needed to be walking about would be held and come before the Justice of the Peace the next morning and fined not more than $2.00. (There is an old expression about small towns that they rolled up the streets at night – this definitely was the case here!)
Also the slaves – if more than three were collected together, unless they are all the property of the same man, and not found on their quarters and were disorderly – the Watch man to note this and they to be whipped at the order of the Captain, not more than 15 lashes. So sad. 
Also they could not be out after 9pm with the same penalty. It was the fear that the slaves were gathering and planning an escape or some harm. Adjourned.
We’ll jump ahead, a meeting was planned in July but for some reason they didn’t meet until 10 August 1810. The same Trustees attended and some bills had to be paid: Charles Harvey was to pay Henry CRUTCHER for buying that minute book & working on the Spring – $28.00. Thomas DICKINSON was paid $3.00 for his services as a Commissioner; the Judges and Clerk were paid $2.75 each for an election and W MARSH was paid
$4.75 for acting as the Clerk. Charles HARVEY was paid 10% of the taxes collected. The Clerk (MARSH) was the person authorized to collect fines imposed and paid $1.00 a day for his services. He had to find his own paper that he needed.
Danl CULP and John BIRD were next appointed Commissioners to superintend
the repairing of Cross Street from the sign post to Thomas GOODALL’s – this section to be bridged over the mud.
They closed with another ordnance: “Be it ordained by the Board of  Trustees of the Town of Glasgow that any person or persons who have a  Dwelling House Kitchen or shop within said Town not having a brick or Stone Chimney Shall have a good Calked (caulked) chimney to be at least eighteen inches above the Comb. of said House and to have a good Stove.
If one of the citizens shall fail to build their chimney as described above described within There, after being notified, shall forfeit & pay the sum of Ten Dollars. Also, all black smiths, nailers, gun Smiths, silver smiths & copper smiths within the said town shall have the Top of their Shop Chimneys arched over and any who may be notified by any of the Trustees and fail to comply with the above ordinance within this month after being so notified shall forfeit and pay the sum of five dollars.”
The Board then adjourned. /s/ Jno GORIN.

 

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 8

  1. FamilySearch.org  http://www.familysearch.org/

H   R   S   FREE

This is one of the best free online resources available. Search millions of digitized and indexed records from around the world. Some results point to offsite sources for digitized records. Don’t ignore the Learn tab; it’s packed with keyword-searchable articles and online courses. The Catalog tab takes you to the most extensive genealogy library catalog in the world. Microfilmed holdings can be rented for use at a FamilySearch Center near you (see the FamilySearch Centers tab). Share your family tree at the bottom of the home page; learn how you can contribute to online records access under the Indexing tab.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

This is day 8.  Including today’s post, we have 2 resources to go. I would love to hear what you are learning from the reviews of the websites. Or maybe you have a website that you think SHOULD have made the list. Feel free to leave a comment.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 4

  1. Vital Rec  http://www.vitalrec.com/

R H Free

The most comprehensive resource for locating vital records. This site will show you to how to obtain vital records (such as birth certificatesdeath recordsmarriage licensesdivorce decrees, naturalization, adoption and land records) from each stateterritory and county of the United States. See the guidelines for information on how to order vital records. If you are looking for vital records from a foreign county, see links to international vital records web sites.

Access contact information for each state’s vital records office to request Vital Records (birth, death) from across the United States.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

vitalrec

This is day 4.  I hope you are enjoying the resources. Vitalrec happens to be one of my favorite websites. It makes it very easy to find out costs and contact info when you are researching in different states. Feel free to share your insights any and all of the websites. It will help me and others to about aspects we might not been aware of.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites

As I was preparing for an upcoming genealogical presentation, I did an internet search for the top FREE genealogical websites.  Specifically, I was looking for sites that were suited for the beginning researcher. This is a short yet, comprehensive list that will allow you to explore (or for some revisit) a large range of resources that will help you on your journey.

Over the next 9 days I will highlight a different website. Take time to visit the website and see what it has to offer. Every researcher should create their own toolkit of resources. This toolkit should expand and change overtime as your needs and research changes.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

USGENWeb

  1. USGenWeb Project  http://usgenweb.org/

H   R   S   FREE

Explore a directory to websites containing free genealogical resources for every US state and most counties. Quality, content and design varies from site to site. You’ll commonly find what local resources exist and how to access them, along with indexes to cemetery, marriage and other local records. Share your own records on these sites, too. This is a site with a lot of depth. You can search by state and by county as well as connect to researcher who are searching specific areas.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

Bonus – http://www.kygenweb.net/ KYGenWeb Online Kentucky Genealogy Resources.

 

USGENWeb

 

Newspapers as a Research Source – Great Website “Chronicling America “

Chron Amer

If one is open there is always a new tidbit that can be learned. Today while teaching a genealogy class one of the participants shared with me a great website that allows researchers to access newspapers from across America.

The website offers access to historic newspapers and select digitized newspaper pages. The time frame that can be searched on the website is 1836 – 1922. The site is sponsored jointly by The National Endowment for the Humanities & The Library of Congress.

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

Check out the site and tell me what you think! Were you able to find something useful?

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

State of VA, Henry Co. Cohabitation Register

The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce that digitization of the Henry 
County Cohabitation Register is complete. Compiled in 1866, cohabitation 
registers imparted legal legitimacy to African American marriages and children. 
It was also the first time many African Americans appeared in public record 
under their own names. In honor of the release of the Henry Co. register, 
today's Out of the Box post examines African American naming practices.

 



http://www.virginiamemory.com/blogs/out_of_the_box/2014/02/26/henry-co-cohabitation-register-and-african-american-naming-practices/