9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 9

  1. Find a Grave  http://www.findagrave.com/

R   S   FREE

Dig up ancestral burial information from millions of tombstone images here. Search by an individual or cemetery name. Users are encouraged to upload additional tombstone photos and submit biographical information for memorial pages. You can even create virtual cemeteries to connect loved ones buried in different places.  I was able to find my paternal grandmother using this site. I also found the headstone of a civil war soldier. We were blessed that the Company and Regiment were marked on the grave.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

This is the last  day of the review of my top 9 genealogical websites.e Thanks for hanging in there with me and reading all the posts.   Please continue to share what you are learning from the reviews of the websites. Or maybe you have a website that you think SHOULD have made the list. Feel free to leave a comment.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 8

  1. FamilySearch.org  http://www.familysearch.org/

H   R   S   FREE

This is one of the best free online resources available. Search millions of digitized and indexed records from around the world. Some results point to offsite sources for digitized records. Don’t ignore the Learn tab; it’s packed with keyword-searchable articles and online courses. The Catalog tab takes you to the most extensive genealogy library catalog in the world. Microfilmed holdings can be rented for use at a FamilySearch Center near you (see the FamilySearch Centers tab). Share your family tree at the bottom of the home page; learn how you can contribute to online records access under the Indexing tab.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

This is day 8.  Including today’s post, we have 2 resources to go. I would love to hear what you are learning from the reviews of the websites. Or maybe you have a website that you think SHOULD have made the list. Feel free to leave a comment.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 7

  1. Cyndi’s Listhttp://www.cyndislist.com/

T   FREE

Consider Cyndi Howells’ site your table of contents for online genealogy. You’ll find lists of sites dedicated to researching particular places, types of records, ethnic and religious groups, and more. Check out the Beginner’s category for guides and tips just for newbies.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

cyndis

This is day 7.  Cyndi’s List is an amazing resource that is constantly growing and being update. Review the site and see what resources can benefit from. Continue to build your toolkit. There’s an old saying, “If you only have a hammer, everything looks like a nail.” Meaning that if you only have one tool, that’s the only one you can use. You can’t hammer everything, somethings need screwdrivers, etc. There’s a tool for every problem.  Feel free to share your insights on any and all of the websites. It will help me and others to learn about aspects we might not been aware of.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 4

  1. Vital Rec  http://www.vitalrec.com/

R H Free

The most comprehensive resource for locating vital records. This site will show you to how to obtain vital records (such as birth certificatesdeath recordsmarriage licensesdivorce decrees, naturalization, adoption and land records) from each stateterritory and county of the United States. See the guidelines for information on how to order vital records. If you are looking for vital records from a foreign county, see links to international vital records web sites.

Access contact information for each state’s vital records office to request Vital Records (birth, death) from across the United States.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

vitalrec

This is day 4.  I hope you are enjoying the resources. Vitalrec happens to be one of my favorite websites. It makes it very easy to find out costs and contact info when you are researching in different states. Feel free to share your insights any and all of the websites. It will help me and others to about aspects we might not been aware of.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites

As I was preparing for an upcoming genealogical presentation, I did an internet search for the top FREE genealogical websites.  Specifically, I was looking for sites that were suited for the beginning researcher. This is a short yet, comprehensive list that will allow you to explore (or for some revisit) a large range of resources that will help you on your journey.

Over the next 9 days I will highlight a different website. Take time to visit the website and see what it has to offer. Every researcher should create their own toolkit of resources. This toolkit should expand and change overtime as your needs and research changes.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

USGENWeb

  1. USGenWeb Project  http://usgenweb.org/

H   R   S   FREE

Explore a directory to websites containing free genealogical resources for every US state and most counties. Quality, content and design varies from site to site. You’ll commonly find what local resources exist and how to access them, along with indexes to cemetery, marriage and other local records. Share your own records on these sites, too. This is a site with a lot of depth. You can search by state and by county as well as connect to researcher who are searching specific areas.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

Bonus – http://www.kygenweb.net/ KYGenWeb Online Kentucky Genealogy Resources.

 

USGENWeb

 

Female Ancestors 1/2 of the puzzle

ImageAnyone who has done even a tiny bit of research in the distant past, knows how difficult it can be to learn about female ancestors. There is a frequent tendency for women to be identified as Mrs. James Curtis in public documents. This makes it very hard to find women’s first names and often impossible to find birth surnames (maiden).

 

I have been blessed, in that I know most of the first names and birth surnames of my female ancestors. If you are only researching male ancestors you are missing 1/2 of the puzzle.

 

Today I’m going to shine a light on Mary Martin Hayes Williams, one of my direct female ancestors. She was born February 1884 in Kentucky and died November 1964 at the age of 80.  She married Hubert Hayes and the couple  had 5 children. Four girls and 1 boy.  According to one of her grandson’s she was a kind and loving woman who cared deeply for her family.

I learned Mary’s full name from one of her grandson’s. From there I was able to find her death certificate which gave the full names of her parents.

When Mary was born women didn’t have the right to vote. According to Historyorb.com  on,  “Mar 8th – Susan B. Anthony addresses the U.S. House Judiciary Committee arguing for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. Anthony’s argument came 16 years after legislators had first introduced a federal women’s suffrage amendment.”  And the Civil War had only been over for 19 years. I can only imagine what life was like for a woman of African descent living in Kentucky. How I wish I knew some of her thoughts and feelings.

This is just a tiny bit of the story of her life. I challenge you to document the story of the women of your family. Learn their birth names and that of their parents. I am blessed to speak her name and have her picture. For today that will be enough.

 

Image

 

 

 

 

Organization in 3 easy steps

Ok, that title is totally false. There are more than 3 steps to organization. For every researcher there is a way different way of organizing information. The method you use choose for organization is not as important as having a method and being consistent with it.I would encourage you to do some research and find the method that works best for you.

Genealogy has come a long way since people were hand writing charts and family trees. Paper is still important (I think), but digital files are used primarily for most researchers. That being said, it’s important to keep paper and digital files organized. To increase the usefulness of your organization the two systems should be complimentary.  Frequently, I’ve become so excited about a “find” that I didn’t slow down enough to keep everything organized. If finds are organized and filed properly (as well as citing sources) it’s much easier to determine what information you have and don’t have an how it connects or doesn’t connect with other members of your family.

A single document can shine a light on multiple family members simultaneously . For instance, a birth certificate will have the name and birth place of the child and names and (perhaps occupations) of the parents. Census records will record entire families and neighborhoods.

After, finding the WW II enlistment records for one of my ancestors, I realized that I haven’t scanned all of the military records that I’ve secured. It’s a good idea to update information for the individual ancestor, for example branch of military, dates of service, medals, etc.  And if possible scan the source records and attachment to whichever database you might be using for your family research.

In the next several months, I need to make sure my files are organized, up to date (with the information that I have) and that all (most) of the source records are scanned attached to the individual(s) that they are connected too.

Tomorrow, I’ll talk about pictures (please make a note of who is in the picture, when and where it was taken) and metadata.

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grand-baby

Nichelle ~

 

National Archives is providing free access to all its digitized Civil War records for the United States Colored Troops – for a limited time

The National Archives is providing free access through FOLD3.com to all its digitized Civil War records for the United States Colored Troops through May 31, 2014.  See here for details:

http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2013/nr13-98.html

The military service and pension records are a gold mine of historical, genealogical, social, and community information.  You will find birth place and dates, physical descriptions, battles fought, wounds incurred, death dates and burials, parents, wives, children’s names, other relationships (marriage and children’s birth dates too), employment information, former enslavers names, and community information such as midwives names, ministers, neighbors, fellow soldiers names, land and asset ownership, and more.

Fold3 has digitized all the Civil War Service records, and has begun the process of digitizing Widows and Dependents pensions.  There are also links to order copies of pension records not digitized from the National Archives.  These are expensive, but you can also download the microfilm information and access the records through a personal visit to a National Archives branch near you.
Have fun digging!

Best,
Kate

Kate Clifford Larson, Ph.D. Winchester, MA 01890 781-756-1930 kcliflar@aol.com kate.larson@simmons.edu Check out my new and updated website:www.harriettubmanbiography.com Find Me on Twitter https://twitter.com/KCliffLarson

Author, Bound For the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero. (Ballantine, 2004);  The Assassin’s Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln. (Basic Books, 2008); and Rosemary: An Interrupted Life. (Houghton Mifflin, spring 2015)

Consulting Historian, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway and All American Road. Eastern Shore, Maryland.

Adjunct, Dept. of History
Simmons College,
Boston, MA