The Joy of Newspapers

Alma Cleveland at 9 years old.

A few weeks ago, I was researching information in the Indianapolis Recorder on the origins of my church. The Indianapolis Recorder is the oldest running black newspaper in the state of Indiana and one of the oldest in the United States. The Indianapolis Recorder is digitized and completely available online. This makes it very easy to search for names or other key words. Using a keyword search for “Thomas Cleveland”, my Great Grandfather, I subsequently found a picture of my Great Aunt Alma when she was 9 years old. I’m always excited when I find information on my family, even when it’s not what I’m looking for. It was so special to find a picture of my Aunt Alma. She was in her 30’s when I can first remember her. So seeing a picture of her when she was a child, was amazing. This is why It’s so important to know the names of all family members, not just direct ancestors.

The article in The Recorder gave me quite a bit of insight into my family in 1935. There were 7 children in the family at this time. My Aunt Alma being the youngest. The article also indicated my Great Grandfather had been unemployed for several years. This article was written during the Great Depression (which spanned from 1929 – 1939). It’s one thing to read about a historic event. It’s another to read about how it affected your family.

Take time to search the newspapers where your family has lived. You might be surprised with what you find. The picture online wasn’t very clear, and I couldn’t manipulate the image. Fortunately, I was able to access the newspaper on microfilm. I was able to adjust the microfilm so that the picture was clear. Looking at the picture I can see her resemblance to other family members. She’s been gone for several decades, but I still think of her often & miss her. Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 9

  1. Find a Grave  http://www.findagrave.com/

R   S   FREE

Dig up ancestral burial information from millions of tombstone images here. Search by an individual or cemetery name. Users are encouraged to upload additional tombstone photos and submit biographical information for memorial pages. You can even create virtual cemeteries to connect loved ones buried in different places.  I was able to find my paternal grandmother using this site. I also found the headstone of a civil war soldier. We were blessed that the Company and Regiment were marked on the grave.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

This is the last  day of the review of my top 9 genealogical websites.e Thanks for hanging in there with me and reading all the posts.   Please continue to share what you are learning from the reviews of the websites. Or maybe you have a website that you think SHOULD have made the list. Feel free to leave a comment.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 8

  1. FamilySearch.org  http://www.familysearch.org/

H   R   S   FREE

This is one of the best free online resources available. Search millions of digitized and indexed records from around the world. Some results point to offsite sources for digitized records. Don’t ignore the Learn tab; it’s packed with keyword-searchable articles and online courses. The Catalog tab takes you to the most extensive genealogy library catalog in the world. Microfilmed holdings can be rented for use at a FamilySearch Center near you (see the FamilySearch Centers tab). Share your family tree at the bottom of the home page; learn how you can contribute to online records access under the Indexing tab.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

This is day 8.  Including today’s post, we have 2 resources to go. I would love to hear what you are learning from the reviews of the websites. Or maybe you have a website that you think SHOULD have made the list. Feel free to leave a comment.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

The Hardest part about being a Family Griot

It’s been awhile since, I’ve posted. I’ve been focusing a lot on my FB Page. Feel free to follow me at The Ties that Bind Facebook Page.

Copyright Reserved. Do not use without permission.
RIP Uncle Clarence

Today I wanted to take a few moments to talk about the hardest part of being a Family Griot. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary a GRIOT (gree-o) is:
: any of a class of musician-entertainers of western Africa whose performances include tribal histories and genealogies.

I consider myself a griot because I strive to document and share my family’s history. Yesterday my family and I laid to rest the mortal remains of my Uncle Clarence. He was a Master Gardener and excellent cook and most of all a beloved father and grandfather. I helped my cousin with the funeral program and updated my electronic files to show his death date. I looked for pictures of my Uncle Clarence. Which was hard because he was a quiet and solitary man. He did allow me to snap a few pictures of him down through the years. (Once, again, I need to do a better job of organizing my pictures.) I did find a good one of him with two other family members.

Although I am sad that he is no longer with us in the physical realm. I do believe that, “He does now see God.” The pastor’s eulogy were truly a balm to my spirit. Even as I grieve, I’m bolstered by the fact that no one is ever truly gone, when they continue to live on in the hearts of friends and family.

Take this time to document your family history and even more important, hug your family members, spend time with them, listen to them and tell them you love them.

God Bless ~
Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby
Nichelle ~

2014 National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair

The 2014 National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair begins TODAY! http://www.archives.gov/calendar/genealogy-fair/

Take time to check out this wonderful resource. Do you wish you could attend a great genealogy fair, but you lack the time and money. Well here’s your chance. This fair is as close as your nearest wifi connection.

Visit  the National Archives for the 2014 Virtual Genealogy Fair on October 28, 29, & 30, starting daily at 10 a.m. eastern time. This will be a live broadcast via the Internet so you can ask our genealogy experts questions at the end of their talks. The entire event is free and open to all, so there is no registration.

There will also be content of specific interest to individuals searching for African-American ancestors. For more info on one of these presentations go to http://blogs.archives.gov/blackhistoryblog/2014/10/28/2014-genealogy-fair/

poster-m

I’m excited! I can’t wait to see what great information I’ll be able to glean.

Happy Hunting Everyone!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grand-baby

Nichelle ~

Female Ancestors 1/2 of the puzzle

ImageAnyone who has done even a tiny bit of research in the distant past, knows how difficult it can be to learn about female ancestors. There is a frequent tendency for women to be identified as Mrs. James Curtis in public documents. This makes it very hard to find women’s first names and often impossible to find birth surnames (maiden).

 

I have been blessed, in that I know most of the first names and birth surnames of my female ancestors. If you are only researching male ancestors you are missing 1/2 of the puzzle.

 

Today I’m going to shine a light on Mary Martin Hayes Williams, one of my direct female ancestors. She was born February 1884 in Kentucky and died November 1964 at the age of 80.  She married Hubert Hayes and the couple  had 5 children. Four girls and 1 boy.  According to one of her grandson’s she was a kind and loving woman who cared deeply for her family.

I learned Mary’s full name from one of her grandson’s. From there I was able to find her death certificate which gave the full names of her parents.

When Mary was born women didn’t have the right to vote. According to Historyorb.com  on,  “Mar 8th – Susan B. Anthony addresses the U.S. House Judiciary Committee arguing for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. Anthony’s argument came 16 years after legislators had first introduced a federal women’s suffrage amendment.”  And the Civil War had only been over for 19 years. I can only imagine what life was like for a woman of African descent living in Kentucky. How I wish I knew some of her thoughts and feelings.

This is just a tiny bit of the story of her life. I challenge you to document the story of the women of your family. Learn their birth names and that of their parents. I am blessed to speak her name and have her picture. For today that will be enough.

 

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