9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 6

  1. Chronicling Americahttp://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

R   FREE

The Library of Congress’ portal to historical newspapers has two important areas of content: digitized newspaper pages (1836-1922) from 25 states and Washington, DC, and an index to all known newspapers published in the United States and where to find them today. Check back frequently for new content. To learn more about using the site, including what’s on it and what’s not, click on the Help section.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

chron am

 

This is day 6.  Feel free to share your insights on any and all of the websites. It will help me and others to learn about aspects we might not been aware of.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

 

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 4

  1. Vital Rec  http://www.vitalrec.com/

R H Free

The most comprehensive resource for locating vital records. This site will show you to how to obtain vital records (such as birth certificatesdeath recordsmarriage licensesdivorce decrees, naturalization, adoption and land records) from each stateterritory and county of the United States. See the guidelines for information on how to order vital records. If you are looking for vital records from a foreign county, see links to international vital records web sites.

Access contact information for each state’s vital records office to request Vital Records (birth, death) from across the United States.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

vitalrec

This is day 4.  I hope you are enjoying the resources. Vitalrec happens to be one of my favorite websites. It makes it very easy to find out costs and contact info when you are researching in different states. Feel free to share your insights any and all of the websites. It will help me and others to about aspects we might not been aware of.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites – Day 3

  1. JewishGen http://www.jewishgen.org/

H   R   S   FREE

Make this your first stop for tracing Jewish roots. Under the Get Started tab, choose First Timer for an intro to Jewish research and the site. Free tutorials and paid classes are available. Search databases of Jewish surnames, family trees, towns, Holocaust victims and burials. Contribute your data to the centralized “family tree of the Jewish people.”

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

JewishGen

This is day 3.  What are your thoughts about the NARA Resources website? Feel free to share your insights any and all of the websites. It will help me and others to learn about aspects we might not have been aware of.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

9 Top FREE Genealogical Websites

As I was preparing for an upcoming genealogical presentation, I did an internet search for the top FREE genealogical websites.  Specifically, I was looking for sites that were suited for the beginning researcher. This is a short yet, comprehensive list that will allow you to explore (or for some revisit) a large range of resources that will help you on your journey.

Over the next 9 days I will highlight a different website. Take time to visit the website and see what it has to offer. Every researcher should create their own toolkit of resources. This toolkit should expand and change overtime as your needs and research changes.

Happy Hunting!

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby

Nichelle ~

USGENWeb

  1. USGenWeb Project  http://usgenweb.org/

H   R   S   FREE

Explore a directory to websites containing free genealogical resources for every US state and most counties. Quality, content and design varies from site to site. You’ll commonly find what local resources exist and how to access them, along with indexes to cemetery, marriage and other local records. Share your own records on these sites, too. This is a site with a lot of depth. You can search by state and by county as well as connect to researcher who are searching specific areas.

Code services offered: H 
=how-tos, R =records; S =share your data and T =tools.

Bonus – http://www.kygenweb.net/ KYGenWeb Online Kentucky Genealogy Resources.

 

USGENWeb

 

Indiana Newspapers (Digitized)

Hoosier State Chronicles

Are you looking for copies of the Indianapolis Recorder or other Indiana newspapers? Follow the link  shown above. There is a wonderful search function.

November 25 1916

Hoosier State Chronicles is operated by the Indiana State Library and funded by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act. We seek to provide free, online access to high quality digital images of Indiana’s historic newspapers by digitizing our collection, and assisting other organizations in making their collections digitally available.

Resources in South Central Kentucky

My Paternal lines are from Kentucky. Specifically Warren and Barren Counties in South Central Kentucky. Many years ago I joined a list-serv (email group) run by Sandi Gorin. Sandi and her daughter Michelle have transcribed and copied a lot of local resources. Even more important for my research, Michelle Gorin has transcribed a large number of records that focus on African-Americans.  This information has allowed me to find birth, death and marriage dates as well as the actual records. If you have connections to Kentucky check out Sandi’s resources. To see what records are available follow the link  African American Records by Michelle Bartley Gorin VonMosch .

If you are interested in joining the list-serv here are the directions. “To subscribe to the list, please send an email to SOUTH-CENTRAL-KENTUCKY-request@rootsweb.com with the word ‘subscribe’ without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message.”

Sandi recently sent out a message discussing two books that I’m going to order this week. Both of them are e-book form, so I can get them with no wait!  I’m particularly interested in :

Freedman’s Bank Records 1865-1874 for Allen, Barren, Cumberland, Edmonson, Hart, Metcalfe, Monroe and Warren Counties.

The Freedmen’s Bureau of Warren County, KY 1866-1868.

Once, I get the books, I’ll let you know what I was able to find.

Happy Hunting!

(This post is not a paid endorsement and I receive no compensation for any books that are purchased. Sandi has become a friend of the years and I appreciate her hard work and dedication. She gives away a lot of information on the list-serv.)

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grand-baby

Nichelle ~

Finding Records for African-Americans Prior to 1870

Slave Schedules
Tax Records
Databases – Louisiana
Wills
Probate Records
County Records
Plantation/Farm Records
Manumission Records

Enslaved persons were not noted (by name) in the, most, census schedules prior to 1870 (the first census after the Civil War and Emancipation.) This is known as the 1870 Brick Wall. Over the next few weeks, I’ll talk a little more how to break down brick wall. It is critical to start with yourself and then work your way back with proper documentation. This is critical so that you don’t spend time researching a family line that isn’t yours. Some people are fortunate enough to have oral history passed down which tells which ancestors were enslaved. Others have to do the research the hard way. To find out about enslaved people you must also research the life and records of the enslaving family. Enslaved people were considered property so often their names were listed with other farm resources, tools, animals. Enslaved person were often times used as collateral for loans. Names were also listed in wills and probate records. In South Central KY Sandi Gorin and Michelle Gorin have transcribed many county courthouse records that are available for purchase. See if anyone has done this for the area you are researching.
Anna Mae’s Oldest Grandbaby
Nichelle

Organization in 3 easy steps

Ok, that title is totally false. There are more than 3 steps to organization. For every researcher there is a way different way of organizing information. The method you use choose for organization is not as important as having a method and being consistent with it.I would encourage you to do some research and find the method that works best for you.

Genealogy has come a long way since people were hand writing charts and family trees. Paper is still important (I think), but digital files are used primarily for most researchers. That being said, it’s important to keep paper and digital files organized. To increase the usefulness of your organization the two systems should be complimentary.  Frequently, I’ve become so excited about a “find” that I didn’t slow down enough to keep everything organized. If finds are organized and filed properly (as well as citing sources) it’s much easier to determine what information you have and don’t have an how it connects or doesn’t connect with other members of your family.

A single document can shine a light on multiple family members simultaneously . For instance, a birth certificate will have the name and birth place of the child and names and (perhaps occupations) of the parents. Census records will record entire families and neighborhoods.

After, finding the WW II enlistment records for one of my ancestors, I realized that I haven’t scanned all of the military records that I’ve secured. It’s a good idea to update information for the individual ancestor, for example branch of military, dates of service, medals, etc.  And if possible scan the source records and attachment to whichever database you might be using for your family research.

In the next several months, I need to make sure my files are organized, up to date (with the information that I have) and that all (most) of the source records are scanned attached to the individual(s) that they are connected too.

Tomorrow, I’ll talk about pictures (please make a note of who is in the picture, when and where it was taken) and metadata.

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grand-baby

Nichelle ~

 

Reviewing Records – W. “Bill” E. Cox

After finding the enlistment records of one of my other ancestors, it encouraged me to look at records I found many years ago.  April 21, 1999 I sent a request to the National Archives and Records Administration, for the military records of W.E. Cox.  I used Standard Form 180, “Request Pertaining to Military Records”.  I provided his full name, social security number, DOB (Date of Birth), Branch of Service, Dates of Service and Service Number. (I belive that I found this information from his DD-214 (Discharge Papers).  He had served in the U.S Army and U.S. Navy.

I received his Naval Honorable Discharge certificate, which showed his Rate and Rank, date and place of discharge.   From the Army I received his 2 page DD-214 which showed how much time he served, service medals awarded. His decorations were

  • Korean Service Ribbon
  • Bronze Service Star
  • Occupation Medal
  • Combat Infantry Badge
  • United Nations Service Medal
  • National Defense Service Medal

His most significant duty assignment was – KC 7th Inf Regt. (I would like to find out more about this regiment.)

I need to place this information within the timeline I have for him and also try to locate the addresses for his residence at the time of his enlistment and discharge. This will help me put some things in context and also show me where he was living.

Anna Mae’s Oldest Grand-baby

Nichelle ~

A Picture of "Bill", as he was affectionately called by his wife in the 1970's.
A Picture of “Bill”, as he was affectionately called by his wife in the 1970’s.